vape explained

Welcome to Vape Explained, which is brought to you by Nicoventures Trading Limited, a member of the BAT Group of Companies. This website is intended to provide general information about vaping. It is not operated for advertising or marketing purposes and this website does not advertise, sell, or offer promotions for products.

Young people should never use vaping or any other tobacco or nicotine product, and adults who don’t use tobacco or have quit tobacco, should not start using vaping or any other tobacco or nicotine products. The best course of action for tobacco consumers concerned about their health is to quit.

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  • FAQs

FAQs

Below you’ll find answers to frequently asked questions about vaping

Do e-cigarettes produce smoke?

No. Unlike cigarettes, e-cigarettes do not contain or burn tobacco, and so do not produce any smoke. Combustion is required for the formation of smoke and the use of e-cigarettes does not involve combustion.

What are the risks of vaping?

Vaping devices have not been available long enough to fully understand their risks and to allow the generation of epidemiological data, which often takes 20-30 years to generate, and would help create an understanding of the long-term impact of vaping. But there is a growing body of scientific evidence being generated that support these products as a less risky alternative to smoking.

What is known, is that e-cigarette aerosol contains harmful chemicals, and e-liquids contain nicotine, which is addictive. Vaping is not suitable for anyone who is:

  • Under the legal age
  • Allergic or sensitive to nicotine
  • Pregnant or breast-feeding
  • Advised to avoid using tobacco or nicotine products for medical reasons
  • Suffering from an unstable heart condition, severe hypertension or diabetes

When it comes to avoiding health risks, the simplest and best advice is to not smoke or vape at all. For those adult smokers who want to continue using nicotine, they may wish to consider using a potentially reduced risk alternative product, such as an e-cigarette, as a complete substitute for smoking.

What’s the difference between an e-cigarette and a vapour product?

Nothing – they are different names for the same type of product.

Is nicotine risk free?

Nicotine is addictive, and it can increase your heart rate, blood pressure and cause dizziness, nausea, and stomach pain. Young people should never use nicotine products. Nicotine is harmful if swallowed, and products containing nicotine must be kept out of reach of children.

Recreational nicotine products are not suitable for use by anyone who is:

  • Under the legal age
  • Allergic or sensitive to nicotine
  • Pregnant or breast-feeding
  • Advised to avoid using tobacco or nicotine products for medical reasons
  • Suffering from an unstable heart condition, severe hypertension or diabetes

It is widely acknowledged, however, that the cause of many smoking related illnesses are the toxicants in the smoke produced when tobacco is burned – and not the nicotine. Nicotine by itself isn’t a carcinogen, meaning alone, it doesn't cause cancer.

Is vaping regulated?

Regulations on vaping vary between countries. In the UK, vaping devices are regulated by the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations of 2016. That means companies are legally required to test products and e-liquids to ensure they meet specific manufacturing and environmental standards, and provide the findings to consumers so they can make informed choices.

In the United States, on a national level, e-cigarettes are regulated as tobacco products, which means vaping products are subject to laws and regulatory actions bearing on their contents and marketing, are or will be assessed for their impact on public health, and cannot be sold to anyone under the age of 21.

A small number of countries including Brazil, Thailand, Singapore, and Uruguay, have banned e-cigarettes outright, so it’s recommended that you consult the local authority website for guidance before you buy, or consult with your carrier before you travel by commercial or public transport.

Can I get a prescription for vaping?

No. In both the UK and US, vaping devices and e-cigarettes are not currently available on prescription, so you cannot get one from your doctor or GP. You can buy them from specialist vape shops, some pharmacies and other retailers, or online. In both the UK and the US, you can get a prescription for a nicotine inhaler, which works in a similar way to an asthma inhaler. It is different to an e-cigarette as it is not electronic and creates no vapour.

Can I vape legally indoors?

There isn’t a simple yes or no answer. In the UK, there are no specific laws against vaping indoors, but most public spaces, bars, restaurants and other businesses have their own restrictions in place. Vaping is also prohibited on most forms of UK public transport. In the United States, the regulations differ from state to state, and even county to county. Consult local regulations for the latest information.

Can I take my vape on a plane?

Most airports and airlines say that vaping devices and e-liquids can only be stored in your carry-on baggage but not used. They are almost always strictly prohibited in checked (hold) baggage, for both domestic and international flights, but always with your carrier to learn what is permitted on your specific flight ahead of your journey.

Is it safe to vape during pregnancy?

Vaping products are not intended for use by anyone who is pregnant or breastfeeding. Little is currently known about the impact of vaping during pregnancy. Studies suggest that nicotine can affect brain development in unborn babies and may increase the risk of other adverse conditions, so it’s recommended that you do not vape during pregnancy, or while breastfeeding. Always consult your doctor or healthcare provider for advice before making any changes to your lifestyle, especially during pregnancy.

Is second-hand e-cigarette aerosol harmful?

According to Public Health England, there have been no identified health risks of passive vaping to the health of bystanders to date. However, the long-term effects of vaping on health are still unclear. Vaping products have not been available long enough to allow the generation of epidemiological data, which often takes 20-30 years to generate, and would help create an understanding of the long-term impact of vaping. However, there is a growing body of scientific evidence being generated that support these products as a less risky alternative to smoking.

 

Do e-cigarettes contain tobacco?

No, they do not. Some vaping devices are designed to look similar to cigarettes, and have tobacco flavoured e-liquids, so are chosen by many as an alternative to smoking, but e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco.

Are vape batteries dangerous?

Most devices use the same type of lithium-ion batteries used in mobile phones and laptops, and these can become dangerous due to defects, misuse or improper storage and/or transport. While reported cases of e-cigarettes exploding and injury people are “rare”, according to the FDA, it’s important to be aware of the risks and the available safety tips. Always buy from reputable suppliers and follow the charging and other instructions carefully – never charge your device with a charger that isn’t meant for it, or leave it charging overnight.

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